Occupational licensure roundup

  • “Arizona Could Become the First State to Recognize Occupational Licenses From Other States” [Eric Boehm, Reason] “Making It Easier for Military Spouses To Get Occupational Licenses Could Help All Workers” [same] “Barbers and cosmetologists in Texas warn that repealing mandatory licenses for their professions would be as dangerous as having unlicensed chefs preparing your meals.” Thing is, cooks and chefs aren’t licensed [same]
  • Meanwhile, in Congress: “Bipartisan Bill Would Stop States From Denying Occupational Licenses Due to Student Loan Debt” [Boehm again on Rubio-Warren measure]
  • “Judicial Sanity on Occupational Licensing and the First Amendment” [Ilya Shapiro and Patrick Moran on Fifth Circuit decision in Express Oil Change v. Mississippi Board of Licensure for Professional Engineers & Surveyors]
  • Ohio tackles licensure reform [Nick Sibilla] Idaho too: “Two Governors Kick Off 2019 With Big Occupational Licensing Reforms” [Eric Boehm]
  • “Even congressmen can’t pump their own gas in New Jersey” [Simone Pathé, Roll Call]
  • “Our results suggest that occupational licensing reduces labor supply by an average of 17–27 percent.” [Peter Q. Blair and Bobby W. Chung, Cato Research Briefs in Economic Policy]

7 Comments

  • “Barbers and cosmetologists in Texas warn that repealing mandatory licenses for their professions would be as dangerous as having unlicensed chefs preparing your meals.”

    They’re not wrong.

  • Less dangerous than having unlicensed PR people writing your copy.

  • So the state has to approve who can pump your gas, cut your hair and do your waxing? how very…. Socialist….

  • Curiously, no license is required to be a politician or CEO.

  • Occupational license problems are nothing new. My great-uncle Jake became a master carpenter in Russia, then moved to Germany, where he had to apprentice himself anew. After becoming a master carpenter there, he moved to Britain, where he to start as an apprentice all over again. Finally he moved to the USA, where they didn’t care. He became a cabinet maker, restoring antiques.

    Good thing he didn’t move to New Jersey.

    Bob

    • my father-in-law was a german master cabinet maker. He did some beautiful work. He even brought all his tools when he moved to Canada in the 50’s. Eventually he retired and his tools were a significant nest egg. People unfortunately didn’t want to pay for real wood and real craftsmanship.

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